what is this I don't even

Jul 29

I remember when I very first played Garak, I played him gay! I thought this would be great! He sees this young man, this young, very attractive doctor on the station, he is lonely, he is the only Cardassian there, this doctor is curious about him, and if you remember, this was a great moment because Sid totally went with it! When he comes up and he puts his hand on his shoulder, Sid did this great thing, it was this sort of an electrical charge that went through him and so I played him totally gay in that episode.

Of course the producers did not actually tell me not to play him gay but then they started writing him a little more macho and more like a Cardassian. But I said, “Listen, one of the great things about Garak is that he is not Gul Dukat, he is not one of those macho, militaristic guys, he is your finesse Cardassian.” So we struck a compromise but I was always very clear. I did not get into it in the book. Quite frankly, I was going to go in that direction. I had written a whole thing about Garak’s sexuality because I felt that Garak was sort of - talk about bisexual, I think that he was multisexual, essentially that anything that moves is fair game for Garak. He has a voracious sexual appetite.

” — Andrew J. Robinson, in this interview with TZN (via tinsnip)

(via hellotailor)

Jul 28

http://ink-splotch.tumblr.com/post/89675817904/i-spent-the-whole-how-to-train-your-dragon-2-movie -

ink-splotch:

I spent the whole How to Train Your Dragon 2 movie waiting for Chief Astrid.

Don’t get me wrong: I loved the power of earned loyalty message, and Hiccup learning to find his father’s strength in his bones as well as his mother’s wild empathy, and I spent most of the movie either delighted or…

WHY WASN’T THIS THE MOVIE I’VE WATCHED TODAY?!

Why I didn’t enjoy 'How To Train Your Dragon 2' or: The Good, the Bad, and the Does Hollywood Know What Year It Is? -

A quick rant I had to get out of my system after seeing How To Train Your Dragon 2.
CONTAINS MASSIVE SPOILERS. You have been warned.

kalafudra:

puzzledpeaces replied to your post:I’d like to know 6, 15 and 20?
I resent that. I was not and am not hard to live with “sometimes”. That should at least be “often”, or more accurately “usually” or even “always”. If you’re going to answer these things, do it accurately ;)

image

Haha.

Uhm.

Why is Anthony Steward Head licking a window?

Jul 27

[video]

Jul 26

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.
A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.
One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:
"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. 

For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

(via kalafudra)

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

(via hellotailor)

Remember kids, being a Goth isn’t about the wearing a particular style of clothes or listening to certain types of music…

It’s about ravaging the Balkans, threatening to sack Constantinople, actually sacking Rome and eventually establishing permanent kingdoms in Southern Gaul and the Iberian and Italian Peninsulas.

(via puzzledpeaces)

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

(via kalafudra)

[video]